BAR Magazine

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Want to Contribute?

Interested in contributing in print? We’re pleased to announce writers support for the Issue 04: Issues in Public Art provided by Now + There

As a curator and producer of public art in Boston, Now + There is building a public art city by challenging our city’s cultural identity, shifting who has access to create and participate in cultural production. To support an expansive, intersectional approach to Boston Art Review’s print publication, N+T is contributing $100 towards stipends to six writers who contribute new critical perspectives, essays, reviews, and interviews, for this upcoming fourth issue: The Public Art Issue. Four of the six stipends will be offered to contributors of color, and two will be offered to individuals who have not previously published in Boston Art Review Magazine.

Contributors are encouraged to apply here by June 30, 2019 though contributions will be accepted on a rolling basis through July 5, 2019. Applications will be reviewed by BAR and N+T as they are received. All awardees will be notified of their selection before July 9th.

Applicants may pitch their own article proposals, or upon award, receive story assignment options from the BAR editorial team. Boston Art Review and Now + There will be available to work closely with writers to facilitate necessary interviews, research, and assets. All questions surrounding application, pitches, or drafts should be directed to editorial@bostonartreview.com. For full guidelines and specifications on Issue 04, please visit the “PRINT” tab on this page.

APPLY HERE 

We look forward to hearing from you!

Contribute Online
We are a community-led, submissions based publication. If you think there’s a story hiding somewhere, we want to hear it! We are always open to working with contributors on making your idea a reality, however, the following article and review formats are encouraged. All submissions should be sent to submit@bostonartreview.com.

Listings
Is there a topic that you think should be covered? Submit information about an event, exhibition, happening, artist, or idea to submit@bostonartreview.com with “Listing” in the subject line. We rely on your community initiative to keep the information flowing. Don’t forget to keep us in the loop with what you’re up to.

Quick Bits (300 – 500 words)
Easy to read, easy to digest, and easy to share. Quick Bits should be submitted within 4 days following an event (gallery opening, show, artist talk, etc.) Be brief, to the point, and have fun! These pieces do not need pre-approval and will be accepted on a continuous rolling basis. There is no limit to the number of Quick Bit Reviews you can submit.

Reviews: (600-1200 words) 

Images should be included. Reviews should cover exhibitions, gallery events, artists, or happenings within and around Boston. This writing should be spirited, engaging, and critical without heavily relying on jargon. Don’t be afraid to express a critical opinion or be referential. There is an expectation that these reviews will include enough context/research to make them both timely and timeless in the print publication.

Artist Interviews: Interviews with artists who are, or once were, living, working, or studying in the Greater Boston Area will be accepted. These pieces should provide a dynamic, fun, engaging and insightful lens into the artist’s world. Interviews should include a brief bio about the artist and context about the interview in the form of an introduction (~150 words.) A variety of mediums, formats, and creative arrangements are welcomed. Film / video assistance available upon request.

Boston Artists Outside of Boston
Do you know of a local legend who is showing work/performing in another city? These reviews should be current and up-to-date and can fulfill any other review format listed.

Critical Perspectives (1200+ words)
Here’s your time to shine! Throw us for a curveball with your expertise and research. Critical Essays will be evaluated for our future print editions and featured prominently on our site. To submit a critical essay, please reach out to jameson@bostonartreview.com to share your idea and begin the editing process. Critical essays can discuss ideas non-specific to the region, but should connect to Boston in some manner. You rock!

Speaking of documentation…
If you are covering a small, non-institutional exhibition or a non-documented happening, your photos and personal documentation are welcomed. Please submit photos of artwork that are well lit, not blurry, and feature only one piece at a time. Photos from artist interviews, panel discussions, or other happenings should be clear and avoid chaos (i.e. lots of other people) in the photo. Please reach out with any questions about photography/documentation if necessary.

Contributing to BAR Magazine

BAR Magazine Issue 04: The Public Art Issue

Boston Art Review is now welcoming submissions of critical perspectives, essays, reviews, interviews, and artwork for our fourth publication, The Public Art Issue. We are pleased to announce that contemporary art curator, Jen Mergel, rooted in Boston, will be joining as a guest editor on the issue. We are also excited to announce that Now+There will be providing six stipends: four of which are dedicated to people of color, and two which are open to individuals who have not previously published in Boston Art Review in support of furthering broader discourse around public art in Boston. 

The foundation of public art is not simply in medium, scale, or space; rather, it is bolstered by audiences and access. The Public Art Issue seeks to examine the ever-evolving factors at play when access, sites, and engagement shape the development of art and artists in the public sphere. As the roles of audience and activism shift in response to tension between bureaucracy and community, this issue provides room for reflective and forward-thinking discourse on the matter. To this end, we will consider the language surrounding public art as the rise of new digital and physical platforms expand our definition of public space.

While this theme presents a guideline, it is certainly not the rule. We reserve space for diverse, alternative, and evocative work surrounding art in the public sphere across disciplines ranging from art, architecture, and urban planning to performance and technology. We hope to facilitate discourse surrounding the following concepts: Expanded historical narratives; community and multiculturalism; land use; scale and form; activism tactics; institutional restraints and access; and more.

Submission guidelines

The following items should be included in a pitch and sent to submit@bostonartreview.com 

  • Type of content (i.e. review, interview, etc.) 
  • Intent of the piece (abstract/overview)
  • Make a case for the connection to the theme 
  • Anticipate image needs 
  • Short writer or artist bio 

The following items should be included in a final draft / submission: 

  • Google folder containing your writing and/or images with sharing specifications are set to “anyone with link can edit.”
  • First and last name as you would like it presented in print, the title of your piece, any formatting specifications, and image attributes.
  • Writer and artist bio
  • Upon notification of acceptance, all images should be uploaded as high quality .TIFF files at 300dpi in CMYK Image Mode AND as .jpegs. Failure to meet these requirements will affect your consideration.
  • Image attributes and captions are imperative. If you need to acquire press images, illustrations, or artwork to accompany your piece, please reach out directly before July 1st.

Boston Art Review is neither an academic journal, nor a news magazine; rather it is a hybrid that combines scholarship, criticism, and a creative voice that spans across genres and reaches diverse audiences. Text submissions may fit into the following categories, but our editorial team are happy to work with you on developing stories. We welcome pieces that are poignant, engaging, pertinent, and relevant to our time and place. The theme “Public Art” should be used as a guideline for Issue 04.

Critical Perspectives / Think Pieces: Approximately 1,500 -2,000 words. These essays will present a critical discussion and evaluation of issues or ideas relevant to art and culture. These pieces may or may not directly reflect Boston, but should reference the region within the piece. We encourage you to research or seek quotes and perspectives as needed. Creativity in this medium is expected!

Reviews: Approximately 800 – 1,000 words. Images should be included. Reviews should cover exhibitions, gallery events, artists, or happenings within and around Boston. This writing should be spirited, engaging, and critical without heavily relying on jargon. Don’t be afraid to express a critical opinion or be referential. There is an expectation that these reviews will include enough context/research to make them both timely and timeless in the print publication.

Essays: Approximately 1,500 words. Images / artwork included is preferred. These pieces are similar to the critical perspectives but allow more room for reference to your own work, scholarship, or position within the community.

Artist Interviews: Interviews with artists who are, or once were, living, working, or studying in the Greater Boston Area will be accepted. These pieces should provide a dynamic, fun, engaging and insightful lens into the artist’s world. Interviews should include a brief bio about the artist and context about the interview in the form of an introduction (less than 150 words.) A variety of mediums, formats, and creative arrangements are welcomed. Film / video assistance available upon request.

Artist Profiles: Similar to artist interviews, we are welcoming work on artists with a connection to Boston. Their work should explore the theme, Tracing Movement. Profiles can be written about yourself in a third person context if you are intending to include a portfolio or body of work within the print.

Artist Work: We are accepting work from artists of all mediums. While all artwork submissions must be in the form of images with text, we can create dynamic content for the online site in order to include video, portfolios, links, etc. * All of the above are also accepted on a rolling basis for the online platform. Our editorial team are happy to work with you on story ideas, event coverage, film, and photo documentation.

 

Apply to a writers stipend award supported by Now+There! 

 

As a curator and producer of public art in Boston, Now + There is building a public art city by challenging our city’s cultural identity, shifting who has access to create and participate in cultural production. To support an expansive, intersectional approach to Boston Art Review’s print publication, N+T is contributing $100 to stipends for six writers who contribute new critical perspectives, essays, reviews, and interviews, for this upcoming fourth issue: The Public Art Issue. Four of the six stipends will be offered to contributors of color and two will be offered  to individuals who have not previously published in Boston Art Review Magazine.

Contributors are encouraged to apply here by June 30, 2019 though contributions will be accepted on a rolling basis through July 5, 2019. Applications will be reviewed by BAR and N+T as they are received. All awardees will be notified of their selection before July 9th.

Applicants may pitch their own article proposals, or upon award, receive story assignment options from the BAR editorial team. Boston Art Review and Now + There will be available to work closely with writers to facilitate necessary interviews, research, and assets. All questions surrounding application, pitches, or drafts should be directed to editorial@bostonartreview.com

APPLY HERE

We look forward to hearing from you!

 

About our Guest Editor, Jen Mergel 

We are excited to welcome contemporary art curator, Jen Mergel, rooted in Boston, as our first guest editor.

Jen Mergel has organized more than 50 exhibitions with contemporary art and artists for museum and academic communities and the public realm. In 2018, Mergel was The Armory Show Curator of Platform and presented fifteen site-responsive artist commissions and installations under the theme The Contingent; and in Boston, she organized the citywide public art exhibition, Fog x FLO: Fujiko Nakaya on the Emerald Necklace. She is currently researching the public works of Nancy Spero and Guest Editor for the Boston Art Review Magazine: The Public Art Issue (September 2019). From 2010-2017, Mergel served as the Beal Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where she was also the Interim Chair of the Linde Family Wing for Contemporary Art. Her presentations included the touring exhibition Permission to be Global/Prácticas Globales; the U.S. museum debut Lee Mingwei: Sonic Blossom; and Darkness Made Visible: Derek Jarman and Mark Bradford. Previously at Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art from 2005-2010, Mergel organized Tara Donovan and Charles LeDray: workworkworkworkwork and thematic shows including Acting Out: Social Experiments in Video. Prior curatorial projects include those at the Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy Andover, the Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College, the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, Skidmore College, and the 2004 Whitney Biennial.

Mergel currently serves as Vice President for the Association of Art Museum Curators. She graduated summa cum laude in Visual and Environmental Studies from Harvard University, received her M.A. from Bard’s Center for Curatorial Studies, and is a 2017 Fellow of the Center for Curatorial Leadership. She is Founding Director of the Curatorial Network Accelerator of Boston, a nascent program that fosters citywide partnerships to expand cultural equity, collaboration and audience for arts in Boston.