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We are a community-led, submissions based publication. If you think there’s a story hiding somewhere, we want to hear it! We are always open to working with contributors on making your idea a reality, however, the following article and review formats are encouraged. All submissions should be sent to submit@bostonartreview.com.

Listings
Is there a topic that you think should be covered? Submit information about an event, exhibition, happening, artist, or idea to submit@bostonartreview.com with “Listing” in the subject line. We rely on your community initiative to keep the information flowing. Don’t forget to keep us in the loop with what you’re up to.

Quick Bits (300 – 500 words)
Easy to read, easy to digest, and easy to share. Quick Bits should be submitted within 4 days following an event (gallery opening, show, artist talk, etc.) Be brief, to the point, and have fun! These pieces do not need pre-approval and will be accepted on a continuous rolling basis. There is no limit to the number of Quick Bit Reviews you can submit.

Reviews: (600-1200 words) 

Images should be included. Reviews should cover exhibitions, gallery events, artists, or happenings within and around Boston. This writing should be spirited, engaging, and critical without heavily relying on jargon. Don’t be afraid to express a critical opinion or be referential. There is an expectation that these reviews will include enough context/research to make them both timely and timeless in the print publication.

Artist Interviews: Interviews with artists who are, or once were, living, working, or studying in the Greater Boston Area will be accepted. These pieces should provide a dynamic, fun, engaging and insightful lens into the artist’s world. Interviews should include a brief bio about the artist and context about the interview in the form of an introduction (~150 words.) A variety of mediums, formats, and creative arrangements are welcomed. Film / video assistance available upon request.

Boston Artists Outside of Boston
Do you know of a local legend who is showing work/performing in another city? These reviews should be current and up-to-date and can fulfill any other review format listed.

Critical Perspectives (1200+ words)
Here’s your time to shine! Throw us for a curveball with your expertise and research. Critical Essays will be evaluated for our future print editions and featured prominently on our site. To submit a critical essay, please reach out to jameson@bostonartreview.com to share your idea and begin the editing process. Critical essays can discuss ideas non-specific to the region, but should connect to Boston in some manner. You rock!

Speaking of documentation…
If you are covering a small, non-institutional exhibition or a non-documented happening, your photos and personal documentation are welcomed. Please submit photos of artwork that are well lit, not blurry, and feature only one piece at a time. Photos from artist interviews, panel discussions, or other happenings should be clear and avoid chaos (i.e. lots of other people) in the photo. Please reach out with any questions about photography/documentation if necessary.

Boston Art Review welcomes submissions of critical perspectives, essays, reviews, interviews, and artist projects for our spring issue, Face To Face.

After two years of seeing the world and each other through masks and screens, Issue 08 will be a site for exploring how we present ourselves in both the physical and increasingly hyper-mediated digital world.

Our senses of self are informed by the spaces, platforms, communities, personas, and histories we occupy and share with other people. As such, depictions of the self can take on countless mediums. Through commentary on painting, photography, writing, video, objects, and digital avatars, Issue 08 will tell the stories of our collective selves.

We acknowledge that bodies are political and depictions of self or others are inextricable from systems of power. Issue 08 is a site to both interrogate the conventions of portrayal and celebrate the beauty of the habits, interactions, emotions, ideas, and principles that make us human.

We recommend familiarizing yourself with previous issues to better understand the type of writing and artwork we publish. We encourage you to think of novel ways in which art and criticism can be presented in print and to manifest that vision in the form of a proposal.

Pitches will be accepted through Saturday, January 29 and reviewed on a rolling basis. 

Interested in submitting but not quite sure you’re ready? Join us for a Q + A Zoom Session on Tuesday, January 18 at 5:30 PM where you’ll have a chance to chat with our editors, learn more about the editorial process, and get tips on what makes a pitch successful.


The following items should be included in a pitch and sent to editorial@bostonartreview.com

  • Type of content (i.e. review, interview, etc.)
  • Intent of the piece (abstract/overview — 2-3 sentences)
  • Make a case for the connection to the theme (less necessary for pitches of exhibition reviews)
  • Short writer or artist bio
  • If you have links to bylines, please share (not necessary for returning writers)

Boston Art Review is neither an academic journal nor a news magazine; it combines scholarship, criticism, and a creative voice that spans across genres and reaches diverse readership. We welcome pieces that are poignant, engaging, pertinent, and relevant to our time and place. We make considerations based on quality and originality and most importantly on how this piece will connect to broader dialogues within the field of contemporary art and cultural criticism.

Text submissions may fit into the following categories, but our editorial team is happy to work with you on developing stories that push the boundaries for how art and criticism can be presented in print.

Critical Perspectives: Approximately 1,500 – 2,000 words. These essays will present a critical discussion and evaluation of issues or ideas relevant to art and culture. These pieces may or may not directly reflect Boston, but should reference the region within the piece. We encourage you to research or seek quotes and perspectives as needed. Critical perspectives should reference your own scholarship or position within the argument clearly. Creativity in this medium is expected.

Reviews: Approximately 800 – 1,200 words. Reviews should cover exhibitions, gallery events, public art installations, or happenings within Greater Boston or across New England. This writing should be spirited, engaging, and critical without heavily relying on jargon. Don’t be afraid to express a critical opinion or be referential. There is an expectation that these reviews will include enough context/research to make them both timely and timeless in the print publication.

Artist Interviews: Interviews with artists who are, or once were, living, working, or studying in the Greater Boston Area will be accepted. Exceptions will be made for artists currently exhibiting in Boston. These pieces should provide a dynamic, fun, engaging and insightful lens into the artist’s world. Interviews should include a brief bio about the artist and context about the interview in the form of an introduction (around 200 words.) A variety of mediums, formats, and creative arrangements are welcomed. Photo / video assistance available upon request.

Artist Profiles: Similar to artist interviews, we are welcoming work on artists with a connection to Boston. Their work should explore the theme, Face to Face. Artists may not submit profiles of themselves.

Artist Project: We are accepting work from artists of all mediums. While all artwork submissions must be in the form of images with text, we can create dynamic content for the online site in order to include video, portfolios, links, etc. Only one artist project is selected per issue.

Other: Experimentation in print is welcome. If you have an idea for poetry, manifesto, personal essay, timelines, a special column, or otherwise, please don’t hesitate to reach out.

* All of the above are also accepted on a rolling basis for the online platform. Our editorial team are happy to work with you on story ideas, event coverage, film, and photo documentation.

 

Frequently Asked Questions:

I’m not exactly sure what my pitch is yet, can the BAR team help me? 

Sure! If you have an idea but don’t know exactly what the right angle or direction is, send us a note well in advance of the deadline and we can offer some ideas for how your pitch could fit into this issue. Questions or vague ideas submitted within 2 days of the deadline will be considered as your pitch and there may not be room for our team to work with you. Please also plan on attending our Q+A session on January 18 where you can share your idea and receive feedback directly.

I’m an artist and would like my work to be considered for this issue. What’s the best way to present my work? 

When submitting your own work for publication, it is important to recognize that unless selected for an Artist Project, we will need to pair you with a writer who is interested in covering your work in the form of an interview, profile, or feature. With that, please note anything that might be of interest to a writer such as recent or upcoming exhibitions, forthcoming projects, or a strong hook for why your work is not only related to the theme, but timely. Why should readers know about you and your work right now? How does your work contend with larger conversations within Boston and the contemporary art world?

I’m a writer who is interested in interviewing an artist for Issue 08. Should I reach out to the artist first? 

If the artist is not someone you have a working relationship with, (i.e. you want to interview Deana Lawson about her ICA show), please DO NOT reach out to the artist or the institution prior to submitting your pitch. We receive a large amount of pitches, oftentimes with multiple people pitching the same artist, exhibition, or idea and in those moments our team has the discretion to select the best writer for that subject.

If the artist is someone who you have a working relationship with, you could reach out to them and let them know you are pitching their work. They might be able to offer news or information that would strengthen your pitch.

Conflict Of Interest Policy:

At their discretion, the Boston Art Review editorial team reserves the right to decline a pitch for any reason. The editorial team will try to share feedback but it is not always possible based on the amount of pitches received.

In cases where the writer and artist/institution/organization (i.e. author and subject) have a close personal, working, or financial relationship, it is the responsibility of the person submitting the pitch to disclose such information. This relationship does not necessarily require termination of the pitch, but at the discretion of the editorial team may be reworked to reflect that relationship through framing (i.e. shifting to a personal essay, conversation, etc.)

The editorial team may decline a pitch due to their own relationship to a subject. The editorial team will disclose that conflict should it arise and offer an alternative should it seem fit.

The editorial team will not consider pitches from a writer whom a gallery, institution, PR firm, or organization has commissioned to pitch. Suggestions from galleries, institutions, organizations may be considered at the discretion of the editorial team and in the instance of an available writer.

 

Issue 08 call for submissions artwork provided by Anthony Peyton Young: Candlelight Vigil, 2019. Oil on canvas, 48 x 32 inches. Courtesy of the artist.